Episode 39: Depeche Mode

Depeche Mode
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Wellp, it finally happened—Max is officially an old maid. And in a desperate attempt to fend off thoughts of her own mortality, she’s looking as far back as possible, to her very first favorite band: Depeche Mode.

Depeche Mode has always been the kind of band that inspired fervent devotion, which is apparent in the fans that take over their Facebook account and the rabid crowds that still pack arenas to see them. But they’re also a band that became defiantly less accessible over time, starting with a sugary sweet synth pop album (courtesy of a pre-Erasure Vince Clark) and evolving over the course of two decades into a dark, pseudo-industrial act with impeccably arranged songs about addiction, suicide, and S&M. So, the perfect band for an 11 year old kid to obsess over.

Of course, one’s taste can change a lot after 19 years, and Andrew’s exposure to the band amounts to his Dad’s poorly assembled copy of one of their least popular albums. Will they come to their own personal Jesus? Or decide to enjoy the silence instead? Also: The Residents play Ed Sullivan, God dies again, and we discover the albums that shook Polish rock.

Music:

Shake the Disease
I Sometimes Wish I Was Dead
New Life
Any Second Now (Voices)
My Secret Garden
The Sun and the Rainfall
Love, In Itself
More Than a Party
Everything Counts
Something to Do
People are People
Blasphemous Rumours
Stripped
New Dress
Never Let Me Down Again
Little 15
To Have and To Hold
Enjoy the Silence
Waiting for the Night
Blue Dress
I Feel You
In Your Room
Rush
Home
Useless
Insight
Shine
Freelove
Policy of Truth
A Question of Lust
But Not Tonight

One thought on “Episode 39: Depeche Mode

  1. Bad Andrew! Black Celebration is great. I love all the strange samples, quasi-industrial sounds, and it’s fun and weird. Takes me back to being a sad teenager every listen.

    You should have done Playing the Angel. Not their best but a solid comeback with some new sounds and good songs. Way better than Exciter and was pretty critically acclaimed at the time. Everything after that I agree is pretty bad.

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